Wharton Business School accepts crypto payments for blockchain program

The project will address the business and regulatory aspects of distributed ledger technology.

Wharton Business School accepts crypto payments for blockchain program

The University of Pennsylvania's Wharton School of Business in the United States is accepting Bitcoin (BTC) and other cryptocurrencies for tuition fees, Bloomberg reports. The adoption will however be limited to the new online blockchain and digital assets program slated to begin in January.

This six-week program, called "Economics of Blockchain and Digital Assets," is expected to attract thousands of students each year. For its crypto payments, the Wharton School will use Coinbase Commerce, the e-commerce platform operated by the cryptocurrency exchange based in the United States.

Coursera now offers an introductory class to crypto and blockchain at Wharton, part of a more extensive course on financial technology or fintech.

The Philadelphia-based Wharton Business School said it will be the first Ivy League school or U.S. business school to accept cryptocurrencies from program participants.

According to the program's academic director, Wharton professor and blockchain author Kevin Werbach, the program is designed for executives and professionals from traditional finance, management, and technology backgrounds.

To offer the certificate program, Wharton will partner with blockchain consulting firm Prysm Group.

A generous gift of $5 million in Bitcoin earlier this year made headlines at the business school. Five million dollars, roughly equal to 118 Bitcoin, were donated by an anonymous benefactor in May.

It is reported that the highly revered business school converted the donation into fiat without delay, which was worth over $7 million at the time of writing.

A recent partnership between the World Economic Forum and the Blockchain and Digital Asset Project at the Wharton School was announced.

The project will address the business and regulatory aspects of distributed ledger technology under the leadership of Professor Kevin Werbach.